AIST Stories No1
17/36

Leading the way AIST!15*6 Desiccant air-conditioning: An air-conditioning system in which a desiccant is used to remove moisture in order to make a living space comfortable. Compared with a conventional moisture removal system based on cooling/dew condensation, reheating energy is not required due to prevention of supercooling; low temperature waste heat discharged from an air-conditioner can be used as the heat source for drying and regenerating the desiccant. For this reason, electricity consumption can be reduced. Contribution to energy conservation is expected.*7 HASClay: Developed at AIST, a high performance moisture adsorption/desorption material comprised of a composite of low crystallinity clay and amorphous aluminum silicate (main component is Si (silicon) -Al (aluminum)). The term was coined by combining HAS (Hydroxyl Aluminum Silicate) from the amorphous aluminum silicate component and Clay from the low crystallinity lamellar clay mineral component. HASClay can be used over a wide range of relative humidities, and is expected to be used in next-generation energy-conserving/comfort construction materials.Simultaneously with popularization in Japan, rollout in Asian markets is also anticipated. As opposed to the relatively dry climates of Europe and North America, a hot and humid monsoon season occurs across Southeast Asia. Economic development is expected to continue in Asia and in the near future, demands for energy conservation and comfortable living are likely to rise. For both of these demands, I believe humidity-controlling construction materials can contribute greatly.We are currently engaged in R&D of “non-fired ceramics” that bring out to the greatest degree possible the features of nanoporous ceramics. In Japan, a history already exists for wet processing methods that knead materials such as plaster and gypsum and then dry them. Plastered walls last for several decades and if they are damaged, they can be repaired by painting over. We feel that coating-type humidity-controlling walls that utilize HASclay have potential. Food, clothing and shelter are the fundamentals of human life. We plan to continue to actively contribute to industries that improve the shelter component.Mold growth testsComparison of a mud wall and Ecocaratobjective of developing highly functional porous ceramics. He is primarily developing moisture adsorption and release materials suitable for desiccant air-conditioning*6, which uses desiccants to soak up moisture in the air and thereby increase the comfort of living spaces. Compared with standard air-conditioners, desiccant air-conditioning systems are expected to be able to conserve energy by reducing electricity consumption. This air-conditioning system has already been incorporated into some residential air-conditioners but there is still scope to improve on the capacity of moisture adsorption and releases by the desiccants that are currently used.“Many industrial sectors have an aversion to moisture and therefore, one can say that higher functionality of moisture adsorption and release materials is sought for this technology. And so, in 2008 we developed a new high functionality ceramic called HASClay*7. It is easy to apply on a practical basis given that it is a low-cost material and currently, industrial material manufacturers are proceeding with its commercialization. In any case, if HASClay is incorporated into a household dehumidifier, an air-conditioning system that realizes both comfort and energy conservation will be the result.” When traditional Japanese wisdom meets cutting-edge technology, new technology suited to the Japanese climate is born. While this itself is a wonderful thing, excellent new technologies should not only contribute to the applications that they initially targeted: they should also generate notable demand through new applications. Today, energy conservation has become a global issue. Nanoporous ceramics are certain to find a useful place in the world. When rice cakes were placed in a room with Ecocarat walls and in a conventional room that employed plastic sheet, the room using Ecocarat was found to inhibit mold growth.*Test results are dependent on room usage parameters, and environmental conditions such as climate and ventilation. ▲Right: Plastic sheet room▲Left: Ecocarat room▶Humidity-controlling tiles are used in the lobby of the Chubu CenterEcocaratStorehouseCross-sectionOutsideInsidePlastercoat[1mm]Small end tile303mm303mm5.5mmIntermediate coat[5mm]Mud wall[more than 100 mm]Example of Ecocarat installationPhotograph : LIXILPhotographs: LIXILPhotographs & Source: LIXILA visionof the futurehumidity-controllingconstruction materialsLeading the way AIST!15*6 Desiccant air-conditioning: An air-conditioning system in which a desiccant is used to remove moisture in order to make a living space comfortable. Compared with a conventional moisture removal system based on cooling/dew condensation, reheating energy is not required due to prevention of supercooling; low temperature waste heat discharged from an air-conditioner can be used as the heat source for drying and regenerating the desiccant. For this reason, electricity consumption can be reduced. Contribution to energy conservation is expected.*7 HASClay: Developed at AIST, a high performance moisture adsorption/desorption material comprised of a composite of low crystallinity clay and amorphous aluminum silicate (main component is Si (silicon) -Al (aluminum)). The term was coined by combining HAS (Hydroxyl Aluminum Silicate) from the amorphous aluminum silicate component and Clay from the low crystallinity lamellar clay mineral component. HASClay can be used over a wide range of relative humidities, and is expected to be used in next-generation energy-conserving/comfort construction materials.Simultaneously with popularization in Japan, rollout in Asian markets is also anticipated. As opposed to the relatively dry climates of Europe and North America, a hot and humid monsoon season occurs across Southeast Asia. Economic development is expected to continue in Asia and in the near future, demands for energy conservation and comfortable living are likely to rise. For both of these demands, I believe humidity-controlling construction materials can contribute greatly.We are currently engaged in R&D of “non-fired ceramics” that bring out to the greatest degree possible the features of nanoporous ceramics. In Japan, a history already exists for wet processing methods that knead materials such as plaster and gypsum and then dry them. Plastered walls last for several decades and if they are damaged, they can be repaired by painting over. We feel that coating-type humidity-controlling walls that utilize HASclay have potential. Food, clothing and shelter are the fundamentals of human life. We plan to continue to actively contribute to industries that improve the shelter component.Mold growth testsComparison of a mud wall and Ecocaratobjective of developing highly functional porous ceramics. He is primarily developing moisture adsorption and release materials suitable for desiccant air-conditioning*6, which uses desiccants to soak up moisture in the air and thereby increase the comfort of living spaces. Compared with standard air-conditioners, desiccant air-conditioning systems are expected to be able to conserve energy by reducing electricity consumption. This air-conditioning system has already been incorporated into some residential air-conditioners but there is still scope to improve on the capacity of moisture adsorption and releases by the desiccants that are currently used.“Many industrial sectors have an aversion to moisture and therefore, one can say that higher functionality of moisture adsorption and release materials is sought for this technology. And so, in 2008 we developed a new high functionality ceramic called HASClay*7. It is easy to apply on a practical basis given that it is a low-cost material and currently, industrial material manufacturers are proceeding with its commercialization. In any case, if HASClay is incorporated into a household dehumidifier, an air-conditioning system that realizes both comfort and energy conservation will be the result.” When traditional Japanese wisdom meets cutting-edge technology, new technology suited to the Japanese climate is born. While this itself is a wonderful thing, excellent new technologies should not only contribute to the applications that they initially targeted: they should also generate notable demand through new applications. Today, energy conservation has become a global issue. Nanoporous ceramics are certain to find a useful place in the world. When rice cakes were placed in a room with Ecocarat walls and in a conventional room that employed plastic sheet, the room using Ecocarat was found to inhibit mold growth.*Test results are dependent on room usage parameters, and environmental conditions such as climate and ventilation. ▲Right: Plastic sheet room▲Left: Ecocarat room▶Humidity-controlling tiles are used in the lobby of the Chubu CenterEcocaratStorehouseCross-sectionOutsideInsidePlastercoat[1mm]Small end tile303mm303mm5.5mmIntermediate coat[5mm]Mud wall[more than 100 mm]Example of Ecocarat installationPhotograph : LIXILPhotographs: LIXILPhotographs & Source: LIXILA visionof the futurehumidity-controllingconstruction materials

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